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Crazy Sh*t In Real Estate with Leigh Brown

Crazy Sh*t in Real Estate!—a podcast that will shatter the HGTV-induced veneer of real estate, and celebrate the challenges of working in this wild, wacky business.
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Now displaying: 2018
Sep 25, 2018

Have you ever been afraid of walking into an unfamiliar house and coming face to face with a dead animal? Well never fear, because New Jersey broker Tiffany DeLucia is here to tell you all about her several encounters with corpses, both animal and human. Tune in as Tiffany explains how she sold a house with a dead raccoon inside and why it’s important to stay safe while selling real estate.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:40 - Tiffany’s Background
    • 00:48 - She’s been in real estate for 22 years and “basically came out of the womb and started selling.”
    • 00:54 - She lives in New Jersey and covers North Central New Jersey
  • 01:46 - Tiffany’s CSIRE Story
    • 01:53 - She tends to discover dead bodies - animal and human at her listings
    • 02:12 - Recently had an investor purchase a home from a bank and discovered a dead body in the septic system
    • 02:45 - House was historic and no one knew who the person was or how they ended up there
    • 04:11 - The last home she sold had a dead raccoon in the wall that the bank refused to remove
    • 05:00 - Had to put in the notes on MLS that there was a dead raccoon in the wall that won’t be removed but in the end had 17 offers on the property
    • 05:50 - Never crossed her mind not to tell people about the raccoon in the wall
    • 06:15 - This can be a reminder that it’s ok to disclose everything on the property
  • 07:30 - How Tiffany handles animal and human corpses
    • 07:40 - First experience was in Vermont listing a beautiful primary home
    • 08:13 - Received a call that the owner was trying to kill himself while there was a showing
    • 08:46 - Called the real estate commission and they told her the owner wasn’t of sound mind and she couldn’t list the property
    • 09:20 - She has encountered emergency situations plenty of times and has had to call police or fire services
  • 09:40 - Tiffany also trains other real estate professionals
    • 09:48 - She tries to make her lessons fun and memorable by joking to help make the ideas stick
    • 10:42 - Sometimes it’s a scary business and you need to be prepared
    • 11:45 - She joined a leadership academy through North Central Jersey Association of Realtors and emphasizes safety the most
  • 12:04 - Tiffany’s contact information: Cell number: (862) 242-0390 or email her at tiffanys@remax.net 

3 Key Points

  1. Be sure to check all aspects of a house when purchasing - including the septic system
  2. A house can sell even in less than ideal circumstances
  3. Safety is important to keep in mind while selling real estate 

Credits

Sep 18, 2018

Part 2 with the one and only Sher Powers of Nashville. Sher built an extensive background in investment real estate before becoming a full-service REALTOR®. In this episode, Sher tops last episode’s story of too many cockroaches with a hair-raising story of a house full of guns and a spying homeowner. Sher also imparts a couple of hard-earned lessons for new realtors to be aware of. 

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:00 — A re-cap of Sher’s background
    • 01:01 — From Nashville, TN
    • 01:04 — Has a small, boutique agency called Urbane Residential Specialists
    • 01:08 — Works with investors to buy, fixup, renovate and resell, as well as with 1st-time homebuyers
  • 01:43 — What drove Sher to become a full-service realtor
    • 02:11 — Ended up in a partnership doing eight renovations a month
    • 02:27 — Would see 1st-time homebuyers unhappy with circumstances of their purchase
    • 02:52 — Realized entry-level realtors were representing the most vulnerable buyers
    • 03:14 — “My heart was really drawn to 1st-time buyers and helping them have a great first experience.”
  • 05:10 — Sher’s CSIRE story
    • 05:11 — She was working with a family, 1st-time homebuyers, who were looking at entry-level properties
    • 05:42 — As Sher and the couple walked through the house, they found 50 weapons, all out in the open
    • 05:59 — “There were grenades.”
    • 07:10 — Client commented that whoever lived in the house was scary, and they didn’t think they wanted to do business with them, and then they heard a giggle
    • 07:29 — “I’m getting goosebumps telling you now.”
    • 07:40 — After a second giggle, Sher realized they were being spied on, and they decided to get out of there
    • 08:32 — “We were basically being spied on by this guy who had an arsenal.”
  • 10:09 — Houses on the market need to be prepared for the public to come through
    • 10:27 — Realtors can’t be with their clients the whole time
    • 10:44 — Lock up anything related to weaponry, lock up prescription drugs
    • 11:03 — Tell your realtor about any cameras or safe houses inside the house
  • 12:19 — Never allow sellers to stay after closing unless money is held in escrow
    • 12:28 — Had to spend her entire commission on replacing a hardwood floor
    • 12:35 — Seller had asked if they could move out after closing
    • 12:50 — Left a beautiful rug in the living room, which revealed an unfinished floor beneath
    • 13:20 — “The entire floor had been cut out.”
  • 15:10 — Make sure sellers know what is deemed a fixture in the contract
    • 15:15 — Final walk-through had already been done when she got the call from her client
    • 15:29 — “They’ve taken all the rose bushes.”
    • 15:52 — Seller had removed 30 or 40 plants from the yard
    • 17:07 — Got the seller to purchase a large gift card to a nursery to try to match the size and look of the original landscaping
    • 17:48 — “It’s a challenge for every realtor to figure out what their clients are thinking.”
  • 19:59 — Sher’s contact information: Visit her websites com and Urbane Residential Specialists or Urbane Residential Specialists on Facebook

3 Key Points

  1. Sellers need to put away any unsafe possessions before the public comes through, such as weapons and medications.
  2. Don’t let sellers stay in the property past closing without extra money in escrow.
  3. Read the current version of your standard contract so you can educate your clients.    

Credits

Sep 11, 2018

Real estate is not what you ever expected it to be, until you end up in the middle of something fun. Power-house broker Sher Powers tells us about the worst experience she ever had viewing an investor property in Nashville, when she opened the door to hundreds of cockroaches. Sher has worked in both normal and investment real estate, and she’s learned to expect the unexpected. Tune in to find out why Sher values renovations over resells, and how agents can ensure their clients get the best market rate for investor properties.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:06 — Sher’s background and how she got into real estate
    • 01:08 — Started as a real estate investor, buying property to renovate and resell
    • 01:29 — Hit a snag in partnership and ended up with a portfolio of 24 rentals and no cash reserves to cover repairs and tenant needs and make readys
    • 01:45 — Used license to survive – became a realtor
    • 02:08 — Wanted to help new agents and new buyers
    • 02:33 — Specializes in 1st-time buyers and investors who renovate for re-sell
  • 02:22 — Why doesn’t Sher call them flips
    • 02:58 — “There is nothing flippant or flippy about doing a full renovation – it’s a lot of work.”
    • 03:44 — Flipping is a quick, non-emotional transaction, compared to renovation, which is about creating a house that someone will love
    • 04:08 — 1st-time homebuyers deserve good expectations and good education
  • 04:15 — Renovations are houses being brought back to life
    • 04:22 — They’re ideal for entry-level buyers
    • 04:30 — Improve neighborhoods one house at a time
    • 04:47 — On seeing the buyer’s response to their renovated home: “I love the experience; I never get tired of it.”
  • 06:28 — Sher’s CSIRE story
    • 06:35 — Went to Nashville with a client to view an inexpensive property; the client had to return to the car, so Sher entered alone
    • 07:00 — “Leigh, I am not exaggerating—I wish I was—hundreds of cockroaches fell on my head.”
    • 08:11 — Her client got bug spray from the car and sprayed her with it
    • 08:28 — She still can’t watch Indiana Jones because it triggers the memory
    • 09:34 — In real estate, you will see hoarders, and you will see families that live in ways that is heartbreaking
    • 10:11 — “There is a heartache that goes with buying destitute property.”
    • 11:51 — She never enters a house without using her toe to push the door open
  • 12:30 — Note for agents to think about
    • 12:44 — Sher once encountered a tenant who did not want the property shown or sold
    • 13:04 — “He answered the door stark naked.”
    • 13:56 — Encourages her clients to negotiate on the front-end, where buyers can see the property from the inside before making an offer
    • 14:34 — If you’re wanting to sell an investment property, it needs to be vacant
    • 15:42 — Do everything you can to make it easy for the tenant to say yes
  • 16:31 — Sher’s contact information: Visit her website Urbane Residential Specialists or Urbane Residential Specialists on Facebook 

3 Key Points

  1. Renovations are different from resells.
  2. Investors should be prepared for the unexpected when viewing investment property.
  3. Vacant investment property will yield a higher market price than occupied. 

Credits

Sep 4, 2018

Summary:

Early in Leigh York’s colorful career, an eventful sale involving missed medication, a fire, and a rolled pickup taught her to keep calm in the midst of craziness. She has learned that however she reacts to a situation is exactly how her client will react, so it is best to model level-headedness.

Leigh is also working to at the National Association level to set industry standards for realtors and instructors that would keep them active in the field while teaching in order to stay fresh.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience. 

Time–Stamped Show Notes:

  • 0:40 – Leigh York’s background
    • 0:50 – The third–generation of her family in real estate, Leigh started “before the turn of the century” exclusively in farm and ranch. That morphed into development. Now, rather than drive over 5 counties, she covers half of one very large county in Fort Worth, TX.
    • 1:40 – Leigh also loves to travel, teach, and speak to other realtors. She also does consulting on culture for other businesses. Got to do it all!
  • 3:30 Leigh’s CSIRE story 
    • 3:34 While she was doing predominantly farm & ranch, Leigh sold a piece of property. She met with a sweet, wonderful woman selling her little house on a large piece of property––more or less the family farm.
    • 4:40 – The seller explained that all of her kids wanted the property and if she died they would just fight over it, so she wanted to sell it.
    • 5:00 – Leigh lists the property, gets it on the market, and communicates frequently with the seller. The lady mentions that her oldest son is upset, but he shouldn’t be a bother.
    • 5:30 – Within about ten days of closing, Leigh’s husband, who happens to be the volunteer Fire Chief in the area, calls to say there’s a fire on the property.
    • 6:40 – When Leigh arrives she sees that the grass from the front of the house all the way out to the road is blackened. But she’s got good real estate karma.
    • 7:20 – The son had decided that if he couldn’t have the house, nobody could—and he was going to burn it down. He goes behind the house, sets a fire about 10 feet away, and leaves. The fire burns to within one foot of house, splits and burns around the house, then meets at the front of the house and burns all the way to the road. It never touched the house!
    • 8:30 – Before Leigh can call the owner, her cousin, the City Marshall, calls to let her know that the son is en route to the hospital to be admitted to the psychiatric ward.
    • 9:00 – The son apparently had mental health issues and had not been taking his medications for a few days. He had gone to a neighboring town, taken a pickup truck on a test drive without a salesperson, driven to his mom’s house to set it on fire, and on the drive back to the dealership rolled the pickup!
    • 9:40 – So now Leigh has to call the mom/seller and tell her that not only was her place on fire, but that her son is in the hospital and on his way to jail.
    • 10:00 – While she’s on the phone with the seller, the rep for the buyer is trying to call because of course the buyer has family in the area and has heard about the fire.
    • 10:30 – Leigh keeps calm. She did not call the seller and say, “There’s been a huge fire and your kid is in the hospital.” She said, “You know, we’ve had an interesting day out here, and I want you to know that everyone is safe. Let me catch you up on what happened.”
    • 10:45 – The seller’s response was calm. She replied, “OK, you go handle the buyers and I’ll take go care of the kid.” So they continued the negotiations.
    • 11:00 – The house was OK and the grass was going to grow back, so they just replaced some fence posts. It didn’t even delay closing––everything was fine!
  • 11:15 – The importance of keeping calm 
  • 11:35 – However you react to a situation is exactly how your client is going to react, so keep calm and let your client reflect that good behavior.
  • 11:50 – This kind of calm behavior is what can set you apart as a realtor. If you fly off the handle to protect your client, it’s not going to help. So much of a realtor’s skill is reflected in the way they convey information.
  • 13:00 – Real estate instructors can help their students by talking about the psychology of what they do. If Leigh is teaching a class on contracts, she doesn’t just teach people how to fill in the blanks. She also talks about who they’re representing, what they’re going to talk about with the client, and how that conversation might sound.
  • 13:50 – They role play or talk it through so that they can know how to stay calm when the other party doesn’t agree with what goes in the blank on the contract.
  • How do we train buyers to select the right representative?
    • 14:20 – We have to coach consumers to interview their representative. Don’t just take whoever answers the phone.
  • 15:00 – The need for best practices for instructors
    • 15:45 – We need to pay more attention to who gets to be an instructor. They need to be active in the market. If you haven’t handled a transaction in 6 months, you don’t have as much credibility as someone who is on the phone with a client right before she comes to teach. The market changes day to day.
    • 16:30 – Leigh Brown is a volunteer leader in the Residential Real Estate Council – a group of realtors who want to focus more on education and who carry the CRS designation. During her volunteer presidential year, they implemented new standards for instructors, and it was met with some pushback and angst.
    • 17:00 – They had some instructors who had not sold anything in 40 years! While the mechanics of selling may have stayed mostly the same, the entire climate has changed, consumer expectations are different, and the legal side has moved dramatically as regards liability.
    • 17:30 – Being active in selling makes Leigh York a better instructor and speaker, and being an instructor and speaker makes her a better seller in her market. Each aspect helps the other.
    • 18:00 – In Leigh York’s volunteer role in professional standards in the National Association, she is working on the idea that there needs to be standards for instructors and all realtors. She started out as just once voice, but her voice is growing. She believes they will get there––just not at “Leigh speed.”
    • 20:30 – It does seem like all of this begins with people being nicer to each other. 
  • 20:45 – Contact Leigh York at Leigh@LeighYork.com, or call 817-613-2420. She’s on Facebook and Instagram as well.

3 Key Points

  1. Stay calm and let your client reflect that good behavior.
  2. Consumers need to choose a realtor carefully—don’t just use the person who picks up the phone.
  3. Real Estate instructors need to be active in the business in order to be good teachers.

Credits

Jul 26, 2018

As a new realtor, Heidi didn’t know how to keep calm when things got a little stinky at closing time. Now, with 10 years under her belt and her own office, she’s learned that real estate isn’t all glamour and cocktails at the signing table. Not even close. Tune in to hear Heidi’s crazy story about stinky carcasses (yes, you read that correctly), her client on the 6 o’clock news, and how another agent’s calm demeanor saved her from a total meltdown.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:50 – Heidi’s background
  • 01:00 – She got into real estate in 2008, is a broker/owner of her own office which is a part of the Next Home Dynamic franchise, which she recently opened
  • 01:30 – They serve Freeport, PA, a suburb of Pittsburgh, and her 10-year anniversary will be on her 50th birthday where she’ll celebrate in Charleston
  • 03:00 – Heidi’s CSIRE story
  • 03:10 – There’s no HDTV-type glamour in real estate, 9 out of 10 people leave the business in the first year
  • 03:30 – She listed a doublewide for sale on a family farm; there was that house, a big beautiful farmhouse, and another property that was sold 10-15 years’ prior on a farm
  • 04:00 – They’re about to close and 2 days prior the seller calls her and asks if she saw the news
  • 04:30 – Turns out the man who owns the other property on the other side of the farm had a dump truck, dump, and large pile of deer carcasses rotting in his driveway
  • 05:15 – It was a mile and a half away from the property she was selling, but the stench was still terrible; the seller had called the news to tell the story
  • 06:00 – The next day the state came out, cleaned it up, and fired/arrested the guy; he had been living just a few feet from the carcasses
  • 07:00 – Real estate isn’t all glamour, and this story shows it
  • 07:45 – When she called the other agent, she was calm and just said, “We’ll get through it”
  • 08:30 – On the way home from closing, she ran into a deer and it shit all over her windshield
  • 08:50 – Keeping calm when things get rough and the benefits of old and new realtors
  • 09:05 – Things will resolve themselves, or their magnitude will lessen; new realtors get flighty but need to learn through experience
  • 10:10 – You need a mentor; you need someone to call when crazy things happen so you can get some perspective
  • 10:35 – It’s ok to hire new realtors, just ask if they have a mentor or broker; new realtors are excited, energized, and are eager to please
  • 11:50 – Old-timers can get a little lazy and lack excitement
  • 12:15 – Contact Heidi at Heidi@nexthomedynamic.com or visit their website at nexthomedynamic.com

3 Key Points

  1. “It’s ok, it’s cool, we’ll figure it out.”
  2. It takes experience to learn how to remain calm in tough situations.
  3. New realtors can be great to work with, just be sure they have a broker or mentor to lean on.  

Credits

Jul 24, 2018

Sometimes you’ve gotta keep a secret. And sometimes Mercury Retrograde impacts your client’s decision to sign any contracts (dang you, Mercury!). Isabel Affinito, a young realtor in central Austin, knows this all too well. Listen to her Crazy Shit in Real Estate story that involves Mercury Retrograde (if you don’t know what that is, you’ll just have to tune in to find out!), a divorce mid-sale that she had to keep quiet, self-fulfilled prophesies, and a happy – and relieving – ending for the books.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:00 – Introducing Isabel
  • 01:15 – She’s under 30 years old and already a success, she’s been selling real estate in Austin for 4 years, and sold real estate outside of New Jersey for a couple years
  • 02:15 – They live in central Austin now, which is closer to her family in Oklahoma; when driving out of Austin, they say “We’re not in Austin anymore, we’re in Texas”
  • 03:30 – Isabel’s CSIRE story
  • 03:45 – A client who wanted to sell their house said they wanted to wait until after Mercury Retrograde to sell because contracts aren’t to be signed during that time
  • 04:30 – Isabel was respectful, asked questions, and asked if she wouldn’t take an offer if it was given during Mercury Retrograde; the client said she would
  • 06:15 – They still listed the house; the clients were awesome and Isabel liked them and they got multiple great offers that first weekend
  • 07:10 – She calls the client and finds out the couple is getting a divorce; it was like a self-fulfilled prophecy and things got crazy
  • 07:55 – He had bought the property before they got married, so lawyers and multiple parties needed to get involved; she was representing both
  • 08:31 – She called for “best and final” and determined that something would be signed in 24 hours; that’s when she found all this out
  • 09:04 – All the agents expected a quick resolution and she had to keep everything confidential
  • 10:00 – Sometimes the seller’s agent can’t share everything; the other agents started flipping out and wanted to know what was going on
  • 11:20 – They thought the sellers were just wanting to get more money; eventually she could tell them that there was a possible divorce going on
  • 13:00 – They finally come to an agreement about what’s going to happen with the money and are willing to close; all 3 offers stuck around
  • 14:01 – She knew which one was the highest, but the other two were nicer
  • 14:56 – By the time they sit at the closing table, they had decided not to divorce; she felt honored to take them through the transaction
  • 16:00 – One of the hardest things to learn and maintain as a realtor
  • 16:05 – The ability to slow down, stay calm, and act with caution with clients that are highly emotional
  • 16:55 – You want a passionate realtor that can slow it down and get serious when needed
  • 17:26 – The couple decided to take the money and travel; they’re doing well
  • 18:00 – How to contact Isabel: com or on Instagram @funkyhomesofaustin; she also has a new podcast called Funky Homes of Austin

3 Key Points

  1. Be respectful of your client’s beliefs and always ask questions. 
  2. Crazy shit always happens in real estate!
  3. As a realtor, slow down, stay calm, and act with caution.  

Credits

Jul 19, 2018

Guess who’s joining us from the land down under? Rachael Goldsworthy! Rachael is a long-time realtor with a brokerage in Hawkesbury, Australia, and she’s got a knack for visualizing potential and opportunity when others don’t. Inspired by her less-than-ideal experience when she bought her first home, Rachael launched her real estate career with a mission to improve the consumer service experience in the industry. Tune in as Rachael fills us in on a story of a house full of rats, black walls, and stench – and why she bought it anyway.  

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:00 – Rachael’s Background
  • 1:20 – She bought her first property in the late 90s and has a brokerage (they call it agency) with a team of 6 in Hawkesbury
  • 02:05 – Buying her first home inspired her to begin a career in real estate; she had dragged the whole family along
  • 03:30 – The home was in extremely bad condition but she fell in love anyway; her family thought she was crazy
  • 04:50 – It was the worst house on the best street, and she saw an opportunity there; she renovated it and moved away for 2 years
  • 05:15 – She listed with a big agency and the agency had placed terrible tenants in her home; they had severely damaged the home and landscaping
  • 06:05 – She was sad and disappointed and thought there had to be a better way; she let the company try to sell the house, too
  • 07:23 – In Australia you list with one agency; she didn’t know so she got a second agency to try and sell it
  • 08:50 – She wasn’t an agent but decided to put an ad in the paper for it; she got two buyers and both wanted it, she sold it for 75% more than her original purchase price
  • 09:13 – That marked the moment that she realized she wanted to be in real estate, so she could improve the experience for the consumer
  • 09:45 – She’s been constantly growing and learning ever since; she found opportunity in crisis
  • 11:00 – Rachael’s marketing approach and how she incorporates customer service
  • 11:10 – There are a lot of pain points for the consumer and for real estate agents; agents must continue growing and networking
  • 11:30 – She works her business around the gaps she sees in the market
  • 12:00 – Rachael can visualize what “could be” with a property; how she conveys this to potential buyers who are viewing “ugly” properties
  • 12:55 – It’s all about taking the emotion out of the equation and working with the facts
  • 13:07 – Write a list of pros and cons and know what makes the property a good investment
  • 14:16 – She knew the bones of the house were good, despite other cosmetic things that looked like a lot of work; she focuses on the good with potential buyers, too
  • 15:04 – Focus on the big picture and what will increase the property’s equity; make sure they’re buying for the right reasons and are happy with the purchase
  • 16:24 – Rachael’s biggest surprise since entering the industry: People
  • 16:38 – She found that the more she invests in others, the more they’re willing to invest in you
  • 17:00 – At first, she tried to do everything alone, now she collaborates a lot with others
  • 19:00 – Rachael’s contact information: Website RachaelGoldsworthy.com.au or on any social media channel

3 Key Points

  1. A good realtor can see an opportunity where others don’t.
  2. Always continue growing, learning, and improving the consumer experience.  
  3. You don’t have to do everything alone; collaboration is good!  

Credits

Jul 12, 2018

I see London I see France, I see...someone’s underpants? That’s right, this IS Crazy Shit in Real Estate, after all! Broker and coach Anthony Lamacchia shares with us the crazy story of when he took a buyer through a home and a nearly-naked woman made a surprise appearance. Anthony leads his own brokerage now and, having switched from the family landscaping business, he truly knows what it takes to start in the trenches of real estate. Tune in to find out what Anthony teaches new realtors and what advice his grandfather gave him that all realtors should live by.  

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:05 – Anthony’s background and how he got into real estate
  • 02:00 – Selling homes and the online businesses that try to do it differently  
  • 03:30 – Getting into real estate in 2004 after leaving the family’s successful landscaping business
  • 04:05 – His father is now his biggest fan; he now has a brokerage with 150 people in the company
  • 05:20 – He transitioned slowly out of the family business
  • 05:45 – What new agents don’t realize
  • 6:00 – Be aware of what you communicate to your sphere of influence; if you want to be a full-time realtor, don’t advertise whatever else you’re doing
  • 06:35 – Anthony’s grandfather’s advice: If you want to be a realtor “you ought to dress like it”
  • 08:30 – Anthony’s CSIRE story
  • 08:45 – He drove to Dorchester, Boston for a showing; at the time, it didn’t have the best reputation
  • 09:07 – He was new to the business, got the key out of the lockbox, walked up to the door with his first-time female buyer, and knocked
  • 09:30 – They thought no one was there, but as they leave a woman comes out of her room in a bra and underwear
  • 09:50 – She wasn’t even phased, she just walked past them down the hall; he called his friend and he said it wasn’t a big deal if the buyer didn’t make it one
  • 11:15 – Real estate is an entertaining business
  • 11:20 – He kicks off the new agent’s training course by saying 75% of the business is being a psychiatrist and 25% is selling real estate
  • 11:50 – You must learn how to calm people down and listen
  • 12:25 – Anthony is more of a businessman than realtor
  • 13:00 – He prefers building up others over personally helping others buy and sell homes
  • 13:40 – He helps his agents become successful by using existing tools like Zillow
  • 14:20 – He teaches people to take actions in a calculated fashion; nothing he teaches is “new”
  • 14:50 – How to contact Anthony and his firm: email Anthony@LamacchiaRealty.com, check out LamacchiaRealty.com, or Crush It in Real Estate on Facebook

3 Key Points

  1. If you want to be a successful real estate broker, dress like it.
  2. The job of a realtor is 75% psychology and 25% selling real estate.   
  3. You can be successful by using existing tools rather than avoiding them.

Credits

Jun 21, 2018

Today we’re discussing a topic that is often overlooked in real estate: Safety. And not just in regards to realtors, but consumers, too! In today’s episode, Angela Shields, CEO of The Tennessee Realtors, provides us with some case studies that act as perfect examples of why safety should always come first. Tune in to hear Angela tell the story of a realtor who barely made it out of a home showing alive, and find out why even a consumer should verify the legitimacy of their realtor. The moral of the story? If you see something, say something. It could save someone’s life...or your own.   

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:50 – Introducing Angela Shields, the CEO of The Tennessee Realtors
  • 01:20 – Angela represents the state and realtors of Tennessee
  • 01:43 – They support all the realtors that are part of the local associations, do legislative work to protect private property rights, and watch out for consumer
  • 02:21 – They also educate realtors
  • 03:20 – The importance of realtor safety for the realtor and consumer
  • 03:53 – It’s important to know with whom you’re doing business
  • 04:34 – Story of when a realtor needed protection
  • 04:45 – In San Antonio, TX she got a call that a realtor had been attacked by someone who had been referred to her
  • 05:22 – She took the person to see a few houses, and at one house the person walked around, disappeared, went to the attic, and came back down with a pipe
  • 05:42 – He hit her with the pipe, she ran outside to the porch, tried to flag multiple vehicles, and started to run to her car
  • 06:30 – She ran towards the road, a car full of teenagers stopped for her and pulled her into their car, and he chased them in his car; luckily they found a cop
  • 07:15 – He had everything in his trunk to tie her up and kill her; he was convicted of attempted murder and the kids had saved her life
  • 07:30 – What Janice is doing now
  • 07:45 – After she recuperated, she began teaching classes on safety; her name is Janice Tisdale
  • 08:14 – Her background helped her survive the attack and the story gives hope for the integrity of our future generations
  • 09:55 – She tells her story to help others avoid what she went through; in real estate, there are reasons realtors take precautions like asking for I.D. and meeting in public
  • 10:30 – Realtors are always giving back and Janice is an example of that; for years, she came in every month to teach the safety portion of new member orientation
  • 12:00 – The consumer side of realtor safety; the public doesn’t know who they’re dealing with, either
  • 12:30 – Angela heard of a case where a realtor had a mental health issue; it became an issue over time, until finally a consumer and the association had to face it
  • 13:00 – It can be dangerous for the consumer and that realtor eventually left the business and sought treatment
  • 13:30 – Brokers have things in place to protect their agents and the consumers
  • 14:00 – We need a constant conversation regarding licensure and regulations that’ll keep people safe
  • 14:35 – If you see something, say something
  • 15:50 – There’s a difference between someone having a bad day and someone having an actual mental health issue
  • 16:40 – Have safety policies set in your office: Code words, let someone know where you are and with whom, and ask for a license and research (as a consumer)
  • Contact Angela: http://angela.shields@tnrealtors.com 

3 Key Points

  1. Oftentimes your background experience will prove beneficial in real estate.
  2. Upkeep safety policies and procedures – whether you’re a realtor or a consumer.
  3. If you see something, say something.  

Credits

Jun 12, 2018

Have no fear, the Real Estate Superhero is here! Jeremias “J-Man” Maneiro, a realtor in Rochester, NY, tells us the story of when he carried a client through her entire home tour, and how that moment officially bestowed him with true superhero status. But this superhero’s not just muscle. Tune in to hear how he cared for his client before and after her broken ankle surgery, despite how motivated she was to buy. And, for all you cold-weather dwellers, J-Man’s got some valuable advice that could save you an insurance claim worth nearly as much as your home.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:45 – Jeremias “J-Man” Maneiro’s background
  • 01:00 – He started in real estate in 2005 when he was 25, he’s in Rochester, NY, he and his wife Christina are a real estate team, and they’ve been married for 10 years
  • 02:55 – They met at a company Christmas party when they found out they have the same birthday
  • 03:35 – J-Man’s CSIRE story
  • 04:00 – What makes him different, what makes him a Real Estate Superhero, started from this one story when he was showing homes to a young couple
  • 04:05 – In the second to last house, the woman falls on the front step; he heard a snap and told them they could stop but husband told her to “suck it up”
  • 04:55 – Husband thought the next house was the one, so he said to go to it and they could go to the hospital afterwards
  • 05:30 – He liked the house and came back out to get the wife from the car; they carried the wife through the whole house
  • 06:30 – They wanted the house but went to urgent care first; she had broken her ankle, was rushed into surgery, and wrote an offer that day (after the drugs wore off)
  • 07:25 – She tells the story to her friends and family and says her “Real Estate Superhero” carried her through the whole house
  • 08:12 – Reminder to carry short-term disability insurance as a realtor in case something like that were to happen to you, and not your client
  • 08:43 – J-Man made sure his client was in the right state-of-mind before allowing her to write an offer
  • 09:03 – A professional realtor stands out for being careful, thoughtful, and with integrity
  • 10:20 – A piece of advice for sellers
  • 10:50 – He’s had at least 8 different clients that have had frozen pipes, which can cause extreme water damage, when they move out and leave their home vacant
  • 11:10 – He suggests winterizing the house because it’s not worth the risk
  • 11:32 – Someone his brother referred him to had thought he could control his furnace and home appliances from his phone, but the thermostat had run out of batteries
  • 11:50 – A main waterline had broken on the second floor of the house and it sounded like a waterfall from next door; water was coming out of the basement windows
  • 12:07 – They were already in contract and they had a $78,000 claim against the water damage on a $95,000 home
  • 12:30 – This is why you hire a realtor; things will always happen in a transaction, but the realtor is the glue that keeps the transaction going
  • 12:50 – It worked out in the buyer’s advantage because she could select the changes during the reconstruction
  • 13:15 – How to contact J-Man: themaneiroteam.com @jmanspeaks on Instagram, and JManSells on Twitter and Snapchat

3 Key Points

  1. Carry short-term disability insurance as a realtor.
  2. Be a real estate superhero by going above and beyond for your clients.
  3. A realtor is the glue in your real estate transaction that make sure everything works out.

Credits

Jun 7, 2018

Ohana is a Hawaiian word that means extended family and Sissy Sosner, a Hawaiian realtor, has got a true ohana story for us! Sometimes it’s easy to forget just how much of a supportive family we’ve got within the real estate community. Sissy tells us about a friendship that led to a house-swap, and how she’s so grateful for the people in her life who connect, care, and support her in true Hawaiian ohana fashion. Tune in to hear about what happens when you trust the universe and allow magic to happen.  

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:45 – Sissy’s Background
  • 01:00 – She grew up in Hawaii, lives on the island of Oahu, works on the island of Kawai, and has been in real estate for 8 years
  • 02:30 – Sissy’s CSIRE story about Hawaii being all about “ohana”
  • 03:13 – Her Caldwell Banker office is her ohana, her church is her ohana, CRS is her ohana (she got her CRS designation a few years back), and she has ohana in Cape Cod
  • 03:30 – In early 2017 she read an article on a CRS designee Nadine who jumpstarted her business on the cape and Sissy reached out to her
  • 04:00 – Fast forward a few months and they found a school for their son on the cape, remembered Nadine, and connected with her there
  • 04:45 – She toured the Cape Cod market, discussed house swapping, and did a house sway with Nadine when her son had a week off for Thanksgiving
  • 06:15 – They entrusted their homes to each other and it was all thanks to the CRS family
  • 06:35 – RRC is the Residential Real Estate Council which improves the education of realtors and CRS are the Certified Residential Specialists who have gone beyond the regular training
  • 07:05 – You should never hire a realtor unless they have their CRS designation because they focus on creating a community and bettering where they live
  • 07:45 – Realtors are interconnected and family-centered, and sometimes that isn’t seen when people think “realtor”
  • 08:20 – Nadine had connected her with a friend and made time to spend with Sissy without any monetary benefit
  • 10:00 – Their house-swap took a leap of faith; the same leap that clients make when choosing a realtor
  • 10:45 – It’s all about putting the other person first, Nadine does this in her personal and business life
  • 11:30 – Contact Sissy: call/text (808)938-5588, email sissys@cbpacific.com, or on her website sissysosner.com
  • 12:30 – Go to CRS.com to find a CRS realtor or to get more information on becoming a CRS

3 Key Points

  1. Ohana can be found within the real estate world.  
  2. Trust the universe and magic will happen.
  3. Hire a CRS if you are looking to buy or sell real estate, or become one if you’re a realtor!

Credits

Jun 5, 2018

What can be messy and smelly and furry all over? Foreclosures! Especially the ones Sharon has seen. Sharon Alters, a second-generation realtor from Jacksonville, shares her craziest real estate stories which include none other than stubborn hoarders and house-squatting horses! Although she no longer does foreclosures, Sharon recognizes that they can be fun – like a box of chocolates where, “ya never know what you’re gonna get.” Plus, there’s a sense of fulfillment in helping families get into properties they may not otherwise afford. Tune in to hear all about hoarders and horses, homes turned into barns, sky-high piles of junk, and tons of stuff with a grand yard sale value of – drum rolls, please – zero. 

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:50 – Sharon’s Background
  • 00:54 – She lives in Jacksonville, has been in real estate for 18 years, is a 2nd generation realtor, and now her daughter works in real estate, too
  • 01:50 – Her CSIRE story
  • 02:00 – In 2011 her friend who worked with a big bank asked her if she wanted to do foreclosures
  • 02:10 – About a year in, she got a small farm with two houses; one house was on the road and she didn’t see the second house
  • 02:45 – She sent her handyman to rekey the houses and find the second house, he called her from the property to tell her there were horses in the second house
  • 03:30 – The doors and windows had been taken out of the house to make it a barn
  • 04:00 – The horses had been living in the house for over a year and a half; the house had to be torn down, which was expensive because it was in the middle of nowhere
  • 04:30 – The house had been stripped down and she tracked down the original owners to figure out what to do with the horses
  • 05:30 – The bank reimbursed the people that had been feeding the horses; Sharon liked that bank because it took care of her and others
  • 06:25 – The bank demolished the house and sold it that way; a man across the street bought it for his daughter
  • 07:20 – The rush of working with bank-owned properties; helping people get into properties they couldn’t otherwise afford
  • 07:40 – She got a notice of eviction to give to a family on Christmas Eve; she decided she wouldn’t do that
  • 08:10 – She did it a few days later; and the bank waited until February and gave the family money to move
  • 08:35 – They went to the house and they hadn’t moved; she told the bank and they gave them 24 hours to leave
  • 09:00 – The next day they were gone, but they were hoarders so the inside of the house was full up to the ceilings
  • 10:00 – “Yard sale value” is sometimes $0; but this was an expensive trash-out
  • 10:45 – She no longer does foreclosures
  • 11:30 – Foreclosures are not the bank’s fault; banks can be understanding and flexible

3 Key Points

  1. In many instances, it’s not the bank’s fault if someone gets foreclosed on.
  2. Foreclosures can be fulfilling because you help people get into homes they may typically not be able to afford.  
  3. Banks can be understanding and work with people to an extent; they’re not all bad. 

Credits

May 31, 2018

Not all Crazy Shit in Real Estate stories have to be bad-crazy! We’ve got some good-crazy ones, too! Dawn Kayano, a realtor in Honolulu, warms our hearts with a real estate story full of generosity, surprises, and the true meaning of “ohana.” It’s refreshing to hear a story about good people in the world coming together. Dawn tells about how a heartfelt story, an ambitious young woman, a killer cover letter, and a passionate realtor made magic happen. Tune in to hear what Dawn’s client did to buy her father a home he could finally call his own.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

 Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:45 – Dawn’s Background
  • 1:00 – She’s lived in Honolulu for 8 years and is an Oahu native, which helps in real estate
  • 02:22 – Dawn’s CSIRE Story
  • 02:30 – She’s been pushing her Facebook and Instagram more and a friend reached out that she met 10 years ago through a friend
  • 03:10 – She asked if Dawn would be interested in helping her find a property for her father who never owned property
  • 03:42 – He lived in a rented studio and they were going to sell it so he wasn’t going to have a home
  • 04:02 – The friend wanted to use the equity in her studio to pay the down payment for her father’s studio as a surprise
  • 04:20 – She was in her early 30s and Dawn was touched that she would do this for her father
  • 05:00 – They found a ground floor unit with 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms close to her father’s job
  • 05:30 – They submitted an offer and she wrote an amazing cover story; they had received a cash offer as well, so she felt weary going up against that
  • 06:20 – The seller ended up going with her because she loved the story and wanted to support
  • 07:00 – They brought her father into the unit and had him read the letter she had written; he started tearing up and couldn’t believe it
  • 08:20 – He was so grateful and it was a special moment
  • 09:00 – Props to the seller and the seller’s agent for believing in the story; it feels good to be a part of special stories like this of making a house a home; this is the good CSIRE
  • 10:00 – Real estate can be about stories and family and making a home
  • 11:45 – How to reach Dawn
  • 11:50 – Telephone: (808)389-4662 text/call or her website: http://www.dawnkayano.com/

 3 Key Points

  1. Using social media is important so you can connect with prospective clients.  
  2. A great and heartfelt cover letter can make a difference.
  3. Being in real estate is so rewarding, especially when you get to be a part of special moments like these!

 Credits

May 29, 2018

Thou shalt not quit thy job before closing! Jen Teske, a realtor in Edwardsville, IL, keeps a record of all the crazy real estate stories she’s got, but the one that involves a buyer quitting his job before closing day beats them all. Jen gives us the scoop on an early possession gone wrong, how she handled the situation, and what she learned. Tune in to hear about Jen’s 2-hour move-out and how, at the very least, she got her cooler back.   

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:50 – Jen’s Background
  • 1:00 – She’s been in real estate since 2007, lives in Edwardsville, IL in a suburb of St. Louis, and is a part of the “Jen and Jean Team”
  • 02:30 – Jen’s CSIRE story (she writes them down!)
  • 02:45 – One of her buyers broke one of “the golden rules” when you buy property, the family moved in and got early possession before closing and then the buyer quit his job
  • 05:22 – She called the client to ask what happened, and he said he didn’t think they’d check the day of closing
  • 06:05 – The client had to be out of the house in two hours so she helped them move out; a month later he returned her cooler and said they were going to buy in a year
  • 07:00 – She blocked his number and added more commandments to the “golden rules” list
  • 07:30 – Buyers, don’t ask for early possession and sellers, don’t give it
  • 07:40 – She highly recommends against
  • 08:20 – The buyer had no idea that his actions were going to affect other people
  • 08:40 – The real estate agent can’t control the client’s behavior but still looks bad to the other agent; she had to profusely apologize and take ownership for the client
  • 08:50 – Handling the situation
  • 09:00 – She explained to the other agent what the client did despite having told him the ground rules
  • 09:40 – She felt terribly for the boy who was wanting to start his new school after the move
  • 10:30 – How to get in touch with Jen and the Jen and Jean Team
  • 10:35 – Website: com
  • 10:50 – Telephone: (618)541-1010
  • 11:00 – If you know someone relocating to St. Louis, don’t forget about the Illinois side

3 Key Points

  1. Always tell your clients the ground rules...and repeat yourself if you have to!
  2. Buyers and sellers: Early possession is not recommended!
  3. Always handle less-than-ideal situations with transparency and grace.   

Credits

May 15, 2018

Beware of falling ladders! Well, this warning came a little late when a potential buyer got hit in the head with a ladder when he decided to open the attic door. But Kristi was smart: She connected the seller and potential buyer and let them handle the rest on their own. (Potential legal battle? No thanks!) Tune in to learn about Reed and Kristi’s real estate journey and how they’ve teamed up as a couple to offer an incredible and unique experience to their clients.   

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience. 

Time Stamped Show Notes: 

  • 00:45 – Their background  
  • 00:47 – Reed has been in real estate for over 10 years and Kristi started in 2016 as Reed’s assistant after being a dental hygienist; she got licensed in March of 2017 
  • 02:45 – Kristi’s biggest challenge as a real estate spouse 
  • 03:00 – They get along well, but the biggest challenge is that she’s the decision-maker at home while now he’s the decision-maker at work 
  • 03:30 – Reed is more spontaneous while Kristi is more structured and organized; they share a calendar so they know each other’s schedule  
  • 04:45 – Reed would want to spend before and she wouldn’t understand, but now that she’s an agent she understands the investments that need to be made 
  • 05:15 – Their CSIRE story 
  • 05:40 – They were about to board a plane when she got a phone call from another agent who showed her listing 
  • 06:15 - The client had pulled the attic door down and the ladder attached to it smashed his face 
  • 06:35 – She called back when they landed, and it turns out the buyer wanted the $500 ER visit paid for, and the agent said $700 
  • 08:00 – She told the seller to contact an attorney, backed out of the deal, and put the seller in contact with the client 
  • 09:10 – Realtors can carry liability that they don’t even think about, even they go through only 90 hours of “training” to become licensed 
  • 10:00 – On the job training is so much better than any licensing class and Kristi could get that through working with Reed 
  • 10:30 – Advice for working with a spouse or working with a spouse team if you’re a client 
  • 11:00 – Clients like working with a spouse team because there is more knowledge and availability between the two 
  • 11:30 – They are all-in real estate; it’s their livelihood  
  • 12:15 – They do well together and think the same way through most things 
  • 13:00 – How to contact Reed and Kristi: Call or text (502)741-1391 or email reed@reedestategroup.com; they service Louisville, Kentucky and Southern Indiana 

3 Key Points 

  1. When working with a spouse, it’s important to set roles. 
  2. Realtors can carry liabilities they don’t realize can exist.  
  3. On the job training is essential because the licensing simply isn’t enough.  

Credits 

May 10, 2018

From pouncing wolves to snapping snakes, Kimberly Adams-Mann has seen it all in real estate – and lived to tell about it. Kimberly dives into stories of abandoned dogs and hoarding, clues us in on the way she handles challenging sales, and tells us why it’s sometimes just easier to smile. Tune in to hear how Kimberly manages working with her husband, and why she’d pick taxidermy over pet damage any day.     

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:55 – Kimberly’s background
  • 01:00 – Kimberly was born in San Francisco, grew up in Wisconsin, then moved to northern Illinois; she could be an English teacher if she wanted to be
  • 01:15 – Her family has been restoring properties since she was in her 20s; she moved back from England and got into real estate about 5 years ago
  • 02:35 – The trouble with animals in real estate
  • 03:09 – You have to get past bad animal stuff if you want to succeed in real estate, and just smile sometimes
  • 03:30 – CSIRE Story
  • 03:35 – Kimberly received a listing opportunity; a woman had gotten ill and dogs were left on her property
  • 03:45 – The property was left a disaster; she even needed people to sign waivers that they understood that there was a biological hazard on the property
  • 04:00 – She got the property, listed it, sold it to one of her investors, and the investor listed it with he again later
  • 04:20 – There was a lack of care for the property because she had gone to the hospital, but she was a hoarder as well
  • 04:55 – Hoarding: The house had pathways to rooms and some places were not even accessible
  • 05:13 – The biggest form of hoarding Kimberly has seen is papers, like stacks of old bills
  • 05:36 – The property was on MLS but wasn’t traditionally marketed and was sold quickly to the investor
  • 06:15 – Agents brought investors through
  • 06:45 – Doing the right thing and being honest about concerns/hazards and what you need to do to protect your business
  • 07:00 – Kimberly’s husband is her business partner, he’s nicer and the “rainmaker,” and she come in to tell how it is
  • 07:30 – Taxidermy stories
  • 07:40 – Her husband saw a stuffed pouncing wolf displayed right inside a front door
  • 08:00 – She was walking through a house she loved, went into the family room, and saw a stuffed coiled snake in the living room
  • 09:20 – She prefers taxidermy over pet damage
  • 10:40 – Contact Kimberly through their website: tamthomes.com - (262)676-2383

3 Key Points

  1. Do what you need to do to protect your business.
  2. Be honest and clear about your listings and protect your clients.
  3. Get past animal stuff with a good attitude: It may not be bad to the client.  

Credits

May 3, 2018

Can you feel the love? Brady could after Megan gave him her business card!  After Megan showed him some homes, he found the one – house I mean – but not before a relationship blossomed between the two. Now they’re happily married and working together; she with the marketing, communications, and negotiation skills and he as the numbers wiz. A perfect match! Tune in to hear how they met, what they learned, and what the future has in store.  

 

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:00 – Background
  • 01:05 – They are in Palm Coast, Florida, have been in FL and real estate for 5 years; Brady is a financial advisor and realtor
  • 01:35 – Megan started as a kindergarten teacher in NC; she moved to FL mid-school year and a friend suggested real estate
  • 02:30 – Their CSIRE story
  • 02:37 – They live 30 minutes north of Daytona Beach, where all the bikers end up; 3 years ago, she was working at their office, handing out hot dogs, and talking to bikers
  • 03:08 – She grabbed a drink at a nearby restaurant, chatted with a table of people, started to give her cards out, and they said, “Brady’s looking to buy a house!”
  • 03:40 – They started talking, he was with a financial advisor and they were looking for a realtor partner to refer to their clients
  • 04:10 – Brady was looking, but wasn’t in a rush; he was interested in Megan, they had dinner a few times and she met his partners
  • 04:45 – He finally asked her on a date; she consulted with her friends, and decided to do it
  • 05:05 – They had a romantic beach date with wine and a fire; but she didn’t know where he was taking her at first
  • 06:25 – They went looking at houses; they found one that she loved, was good for a family, and had good resale value
  • 08:15 – They are selling it now
  • 08:30 – The agent had told her about the house a week prior, and had posted it on MLS seconds before she called him
  • 09:20 – Their love was budding at the time of home’s purchase
  • 09:35 – Why sellers and buyers should not talk
  • 10:00 – They bought the house from kids selling their parent’s house; they thought the roof had been redone in 1994
  • 10:13 – Brady and the seller exchanged phone numbers
  • 10:30 – She learned that the house had never been redone and was almost 40 years old; Brady already knew and said “it’s fine”
  • 11:30 – They could’ve had serious problems with that, but they got an inspection and it was fine
  • 11:40 – He could’ve gotten himself in trouble talking to the seller; Megan had to take off the girlfriend hat and tell Brady that he couldn’t do that
  • 12:45 – Next steps in Megan and Brady’s life
  • 12:48 – Brady got his license a year ago and they’re looking to grow their team
  • 13:00 – Their goal is to live in the beach town where they met
  • 13:26 – They are qualified to help people in both real estate and finances; he in numbers and she in negotiating and communications

 

3 Key Points

  1. You never know if love might find you through real estate!
  2. Buyers and sellers shouldn’t talk; your realtor needs to be there as a chaperone!
  3. Inspections are important:  The information the seller gives you may be incorrect.

 

Credits

May 1, 2018

Here’s a riddle: When would a buyer question the valuation of a seller’s house due to damage they did to it themselves? ...When it’s a daughter buying from her parents! Jerry Cibulski, a realtor living the life on the North Fork of Long Island, will never forget when he found himself in the middle of a family sale. Tune in to hear how Jerry handled his family members while managing everything behind the scenes, and why he believes family members are best referred elsewhere.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:30 – Introduction
  • 00:40 – Jerry is a Southold real estate agent with Century 21 Albertson Realty; there are lots of vineyards, vacation properties, and beautiful homes
  • 1:10 – Everything is interconnected to create a food, entertainment, family, and sharing experience
  • 02:45 – His parents thought about moving back down to FL but changed their minds; they went down to Bradenton, FL to visit family and he gave them their home’s value
  • 03:25 – He called them and turns out they found a house, put money down, and needed to close in 90 days, which means a buyer would’ve needed to contract that day
  • 03:37 – They said that his sister could buy it and they needed his help to figure out how
  • 04:00 – 3 months later, his dad is saying “shit or get off the pot” and his sister is rethinking the valuation of the home due to a hole in the door she kicked as a teenager
  • 04:50- People don’t know what is going on behind the scenes; there are so many nuances to working within guidelines, especially in unique situations
  • 06:15 – He also helped his sister sell her house and had to walk her through the appraisal process
  • 07:12 – His sister learned from experience; to get the best interest rate she called her mortgage rep every day until she liked the rate
  • 08:00 – When she was ready to purchase and move forward, the perfect home in FL showed up and the timing connected
  • 08:30 – Her parents love their new house and community
  • 09:05 – After going through everything herself, his sister understands the process much better
  • 09:35 – Jerry’s thoughts about representing family members
  • 09:48 – You’re better off referring them to someone else; you’re too close to it
  • 10:15 – Being a seasoned agent, you need more experience and explaining
  • 11:00 – You can set up a team in other places and refer your family to them
  • 11:32 – How to reach Jerry: By phone, (631)404-2507, email, Instagram, or Facebook

3 Key Points

  1. There are so many nuances to working within guidelines, especially in unique situations.
  2. Refer family out to other realtors in your network to save the headache and build your team.
  3. People don’t know what goes on behind the scenes in real estate – do what you can to educate them.

Credits

Apr 24, 2018

Sticks and stones may break bones...but they won’t stop a good realtor from taking a call from a client! Kellie Tinnen, Training Administrator for the Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors, shares the story of when her friend was –literally– beat with a stick by an unruly child. Now that Kellie does broker outreach and in-office trainings, she teaches new brokers how to treat clients, other brokers and property (hint: beatings NOT included), and ensures they’re up-to-speed on association happenings and updates. 

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:40 – Kellie’s background
  • 00:45 – She’s located in Albuquerque, NM, started in real estate almost 10 years ago as a broker, and now works for the Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors as a training administrator
  • 01:15 – She does broker outreach and in-office training; there are about 3,400 brokers in the greater Albuquerque area
  • 02:30 – Kellie’s CSIRE story
  • 03:05 – The worst things that have happened she’s done to herself
  • 03:38 – The funniest thing was “the kid with the stick”
  • 04:05 – She got a phone call from a man who wanted to see a property in a remote area
  • 04:15 – She went with the realtor listing the property and they met the man and his son there; the boy was misbehaving
  • 05:04 – The boy yelled at the other woman and hit her with a stick while she was trying to take a call from another client
  • 05:20 – The funniest part is how she didn’t miss a beat; she told the client to hold, told the father to tell his son to stop, and continued her call
  • 06:00 – Lesson: Separating yourself from flash emotions and keeping it together
  • 07:30 – What Kellie trains to get new realtors up to speed on best practices
  • 07:40 – Starting early with new member orientations; she teaches how to treat clients, other brokers, and other people’s property
  • 8:30 – Buyers can’t take ownership of a property until the deal is complete
  • 09:02 – Set expectations for clients
  • 10:10 – Kellie’s successes in outreach to brokers
  • 10:15 – She had good relationships already before going into the association
  • 10:40 – GAP (Gar Ambassador Program); ambassadors from the association funnel the trainings into their offices
  • 11:27 – 70% of their membership is made up of smaller brokerages, so GAP is necessary to spread messages
  • 11:45 – It spreads awareness of what goes on at the association, so it can fuel political involvement as well
  • 12:20 – How to contact Kellie: by email at kellie@gaar.com 

3 Key Points

  1. Be professional and separate yourself from flash emotions.  
  2. It’s important to train new brokers how to treat clients, other brokers, and property.   
  3. Outreach programs like GAP train and bring association awareness to new brokers.
Apr 19, 2018

Crime scene showing, anyone? Despite any caution tape in her way, Shakeima Chatman knows how to hustle. At the lowest point of the recession, she decided to leave her stable corporate job and take the leap into real estate. She said it best: “It hasn’t always been easy, but it’s always been worth it.” Today, Shakeima has her own team, The Chatman Group, is brokered with Carolina Elite Real Estate, and has authored the book, “Possess the Land: The Believer’s Guide to Home Buying.” Tune in to hear how Shakeima sees home ownership as a legacy, educates her clients beyond just the buy and sell, and empowers single home buyers to shift their mindset about ownership.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:13 – Shakeima’s background
  • 01:15 – She’s from Charleston, SC; her father was in the Navy so she grew up part-time in Virginia Beach, VA
  • 01:26 – She’s been in real estate for 7 years; she quit a corporate management job for a commission-only lifestyle: “It hasn’t always been easy, but it’s always been worth it”
  • 02:08 – She’s only known hustle because she got in the game during the recession; it shaped her strategy, discipline and fate
  • 03:45 – Her CSIRE story
  • 03:55 – She was going to show a property to a single mom and safety was a primary concern; they pulled up and it was a crime scene, the seller was trying to convince them
  • 04:37 – The police officer in her car was telling them “Run! You don’t want to live here!” so Shakeima didn’t have to
  • 05:25 – They had had a break-in; they were remodeling a house in a neighborhood that was in the process of being revitalized, and it was attractive to burglars
  • 06:20 – She ended up buying in a different neighborhood; most of Shakeima’s clients are single women who are doing it on their own
  • 06:47 – The biggest challenge that single buyers face when entering the marketplace
  • 07:05 – Fear and overcoming the beliefs/myths they hear from others; understanding that they don’t have to have the traditional family to have the house
  • 07:35 – She teaches the investment-opportunity aspect of real estate; she helped a woman sell her townhouse and buy a house and she walked away with $10,000
  • 08:38 – Clients are part of the home ownership message; she encourages those conversations on social media
  • 08:45 – Shakeima’s book and its premise
  • 08:50 – Book: “Possess the Land: The Believer’s Guide to Home Buying”
  • 08:57 – Tells stories of home ownership; her grandmother rented a home for over 30 years and lost the home and legacy when it switched owners
  • 10:00 – One of her Facebook friends now owns that house
  • 10:30 – How to contact Shakeima: The Chatman Group SC on Social Media
  • 10:50 – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, website, and by phone (843)225-8830
  • 11:20 – Possess the Land: The Believer’s Guide to Home Buying” takes you through the journey of homeownership compared to the journey that the children of Israel took to the promised land
  • 11:32 – The book can be found on Amazon or through the book’s website

3 Key Points

  1. Hustle your way to success and don’t lose what you’ve learned in tough times.
  2. Educate your clients on the deeper reasons behind ownership like legacy and investment.
  3. Your clients may be fearful or doubtful – be the support they need to make the best decision.
Apr 17, 2018

Dog? What dog? When Linda Devlieg, realtor of 25 years and ex-dog groomer, tells you to pay attention to a “Beware of Dog” sign, LISTEN! Tune in as Linda tells us about how she singlehandedly stopped two attacking dogs, how her clients ran off when they saw a bull snake sunning on a porch, and – if you haven’t noticed yet – how real estate is nothing like what you see on TV. Linda also sheds some light on how patriotic the job of a realtor really is and encourages us to do our homework to learn why.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 00:50 – Linda’s Background
  • 01:00 – She’s been in real estate for 25 years and serves Albuquerque, NM and the surrounding areas
  • 01:20 – There’s a city in New Mexico called Truth or Consequences
  • 02:20 – Linda’s CSIRE story
  • 02:30 – She was going to show a home and a sign said “Beware of Dog;” she knocked, but no one answered and there was no barking
  • 02:55 – Two dogs suddenly attacked her; she grabbed one by the muzzle and the other backed off
  • 03:30 – She went to show a luxury property but there was a 6-foot bull snake on the front porch; the buyers ran away and never saw the home
  • 04:05 – The day-to-day in real estate isn’t what you see on TV
  • 04:35 – Real estate is more important than what the public sees
  • 05:10 – Linda’s husband is in the moving industry
  • 05:15 – He runs one of the top beacon’s agencies in the country
  • 05:48 – He tries to make things comfortable; people don’t understand what happens in the background
  • 06:30 – She’s called him for male back-up before, but he’ll never bring home boxes
  • 07:00 – One thing that makes Linda stay in real estate despite all the changes over the past 25 years
  • 07:15 – The feeling of accomplishment when you realize the part you play in something so patriotic as home ownership
  • 08:15 – The Code of Ethics and history behind real estate and the association is amazing
  • 09:05 – She once had a man propose to his wife at the open house so they could write a VA offer
  • 09:15 – Realtors should get involved in political work; their job is so patriotic
  • 09:43 – How to contact Linda or reach out to her husband for moving services
  • 09:53 – Her website: realestateinabq.com, phone number: (505)440-7200

3 Key Points

  1. Real estate isn’t what you see on TV.
  2. As a realtor, you play a part in something very patriotic: Home ownership.  
  3. Learn the history of real estate and get involved in its political future.  
Mar 29, 2018

This is real estate church, and we’re preaching some truth! Early on in her real estate career, Kim Knapp learned what it takes to be successful. It’s very simple: Just be above average. After selling $6 million in her first year, Kim landed among the stars and now instructs other realtors on how to do the same. Powered by hustle and grit, Kim discusses the importance of doing what it takes – even if that means popping 99 red balloons. Tune in to hear what it means to be “above average” and what it takes to become a true leader.

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:00 – Background
  • 01:06 – Kim works in Jacksonville, FL in Clay County, has been in real estate for 18 years, has a background in ministry and original had planned on working in counseling
  • 1:40 – That background has been very useful in her work now; she knows that it’s not about the money in real estate
  • 02:20 – In her first year in real estate, she didn’t know anyone but sold $6 million; Kim has had a strong work ethic since she was young
  • 03:40 – She read and followed all the instructions in Danielle Kennedy’s book “How to List and Sell Real Estate”
  • 04:30 – Kim asked her business-owner friend for the one most important piece of advice and it was, “Just be above average,” and to do a little more than everyone else
  • 05:45 – Kim’s CSIRE story
  • 06:00 – She went to a woman’s house that she had listed that was closing in 4 days; she hadn’t packed at all and was like a “crazy cat lady” with only one cat
  • 06:50 – Kim and her family helped pack the lady’s belongings while she and a friend sat folding and pumping up balloons
  • 07:05 – They put the balloons inside a cabinet so the glass shelves don’t break – it didn’t work – and Kim was left popping balloons and cleaning up glass
  • 08:00 – She had 4 neighbors help pack and clean up this woman’s home, but in the process Kim lost a pair of Chanel sunglasses and a diamond out of a ring
  • 08:40 – Doing what it takes but having boundaries
  • 09:05 – When she first started she would drive across town for a $65,000 trailer; she gets agents that don’t want to drive far for an $80,000 trailer
  • 09:30 – Treat everyone the same and be above average; you must hustle and do what it takes
  • 10:00 – Kim now works in leadership and instructs realtors
  • 10:15 – Be deeply invested in knowing what’s happening in the industry and educate yourself constantly
  • 10:45 – Realtors are the voice for property owners; they aren’t banded together like realtors are
  • 12:05 – People will respect and value you if you put in the work to become a true leader
  • 12:45 – How to reach Kim and Team Knapp: Office Phone Number (904)637-0285, Cell Number (904)334-7425, or by visiting her website teamknapp.com

3 Key Points

  1. Just be above average; do more than anyone else.
  2. Treat everyone the same and do the right thing.
  3. Know what’s going on in the industry and educate yourself constantly; the learning is never over.
Mar 27, 2018

Kynse Leigh is a trooper. In 2014, she opened her own brokerage –just to find out two years later that she had a failing kidney and would need a transplant. That didn’t stop Kynse from documenting her journey with Facebook Live videos, continuing her work, spending time with her son, and creating awareness around the transplant journey and the importance of being a donor. Tune in to hear how Kynse was supported by her community of realtors, how she connected with her donor’s family, and why she’s got not one, but three kidneys now! 

Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:00 – Kynse’s background
  • 01:10 – Kynse started as an assistant with ReMax in 2000, was licensed in 2003, and opened her brokerage Remax Dream in downtown Fort Myers, FL in 2014
  • 01:50 – She had two agents and was the short-sale queen for a while
  • 02:00 – Her health journey
  • 02:45 – In October of 2016, she was told she had a failing kidney and would need a transplant
  • 03:25 – She would need a kidney and pancreas transplant so she would avoid kidney failure and no longer be a Type I Diabetic; she’s 37 years old and has a 9-year-old son
  • 04:55 – She grew up as a Type I Diabetic and went through everything that comes with that
  • 05:20 – She feels blessed because she still has her eyesight, limbs, and has no other diabetic issues; she actually has 3 kidneys now, including the new one
  • 06:50 – She refused to start dialysis; she wanted to be there for her son and realtors and be doing things
  • 07:49 – She documented the whole transplant process to share the journey, starting with the first call from the transplant team
  • 09:53 – Her documentation shows people what the process is like; Leigh Brown and her son have watched the videos because he has kidney issues as well
  • 11:05 – Her son has been very supportive of her; Kynse is happy her journey has helped Leigh’s son in his own
  • 13:30 – Being real, authentic, and yourself goes a long way; Kynse has connected with incredible realtors going through their own health challenges
  • 14:40 – The community of realtors has been amazing and supportive
  • 15:22 – The transplant family and the connection
  • 16:20 - Most people write letters that go through LifeLink to connect to the donor family; her donor was named Elijah and was 15 when he passed
  • 16:53 – She didn’t receive much information about the donor, and the donor didn’t receive much information about her
  • 17:30 – She comes up if you Google “Florida kidney and pancreas transplant” because of her work in raising awareness around it
  • 18:08 – They found his GoFundMe page and the donor’s family found her
  • 19:00 – Become a donor: Only 45% of Americans are registered organ donors; 115,000 people in America are waiting for an organ and an average of 21 people pass away each day waiting
  • 20:20 – Her organ donor saved 6 lives, he has a page and hashtag #sixisgreaterthantwentyone
  • 21:50 – On the iPhone Health App, you can sign up to become an organ donor in minutes; or go to org if you don’t have an iPhone
  • 22:58 – Let your family know your wishes; they could say no
  • 24:50 – You could be a living donor; you only need one kidney to live and you can donate a portion of your liver (it grows back)
  • 26:15 – Being a broker through all this change
  • 26:45 – Her office management and agents are amazing; she lost a few agents and realized who she chooses to spend her time with
  • 28:00 – Use hashtag #dontburygoodorgans when you sign up to be a donor and support
  • 28:47 – Stay in touch
  • 28:54 - Remax Dream contacts: Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, email, website
  • 29:15 – Kynse’s contact information: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook

3 Key Points

  1. Remain optimistic.
  2. You have the chance to touch lives; become an organ donor.
  3. Support those that inspire you and connect with others that have a relatable journey.  
Mar 22, 2018

Stephanie White has worn many hats in the real estate world. She’s gone from realtor, to broker, to managing and regional broker, to working in the association world – and not necessarily in that order. Stephanie gets into the problem of new shiny things on the market when realtors should just focus on what’s tried and true. Tune in to hear how you can’t buy likeability, why authenticity always wins, and what it means to be proactive.

Please subscribe in Apple Podcasts or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes

  • 01:15 – Stephanie’s background
  • 01:20 – Stephanie is in Mobile, Alabama, has been there for 2 years, and was in Florida for 25 years
  • 01:35 – She worked and volunteered at 5 different associations, started as a realtor, became a broker, then became a managing and regional broker
  • 02:10 – She worked with a company that sold leads and measured ratios from call to close; the results were enlightening because she had no idea how it worked
  • 03:28 – Understanding conversion rates was something she didn’t know for the first 10 years of being in real estate, and that was after getting out of the selling side
  • 03:50 – It’s critical for realtors now to drill into their own markets
  • 04:30 –Every realtor should have to go through the process of listing their own home and purchasing a home before leading a client through the process
  • 04:50 – Before you’ve lived it, it’s hard to council and advise someone going thorough it
  • 05:00 – Her cross-sale with her purchase was with a successful woman; Stephanie learned that it was about tenacity and staying with it
  • 06:00 – Her association members are inundated with new things that want their money and time, but door-knocking, cold-calling, marketing, and authenticity still win
  • 06:45 – Likeable realtors do well because they’re authentic
  • 07:35 – There will always be someone who doesn’t like you; don’t take it personally
  • 08:55 – Facebook groups: No one is who they are online
  • 09:40 – Social Media
  • 09:53 – Stephanie sticks to work and cat videos; there’s so much noise out there
  • 10:18 – As an associate executive, you must be where your members are
  • 10:45 – Mobile association: Big events, participation, and culture, but there were certain gaps
  • 11:30 – Policy manual creation for Mobile
  • 12:23 – Sending members and staff to national events so they are educated themselves
  • 12:53 – They have credibility with members so they’ll listen
  • 13:15 – New perspectives and people add value and engage members
  • 14:36 – The importance of knowing the “why” behind what’s going on
  • 14:48 – People fear change but need to be adaptable and proactive; you should anticipate change that is coming and make thoughtful decisions
  • 15:48 – Talk to your association executive, get them to listen to this episode, and have a conversation about your involvement; consumers, too
  • 16:15 – Associations give realtors comradery, education, and current happenings
  • 16:37 – How to reach Stephanie White
  • 16:42 – Stephanie Sharp White on Facebook or email Stephanie@gcmls.com 

3 Key Points

  1. Experience what it is you are advising and counseling on.
  2. Be outrageously authentic; people will see if you are trying to be someone else.
  3. You won’t be liked by everyone – its ok – don’t take it personally.
Mar 20, 2018

Laura Fangman, realtor of 10 years and micro-farmer, gives us the dirt on some drama that ensued when she showed a home to a buyer who had recently gotten into a fight with the seller, unbeknownst to her. Laura reflects on her experience as a new realtor and how she learned to select her clients carefully from that point on. Tune in to hear how Laura insists on asking better questions, receiving better answers, and what she does if she can’t get them.  

Please subscribe to this podcast in Apple Podcasts or in the Podcasts App on your phone. Never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting The Leigh Brown Experience.

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:20 – Laura is in Virginia with a micro-farm outside of D.C., has been licensed in Georgia and Tennessee, and has been licensed for 10 years
  • 02:25 – Laura’s CSIRE story
  • 02:30 – 10 years ago, she got a call on her cell; it was an agent from a close market, from the same brokerage, calling to refer a client
  • 03:10- She spoke to the people and was excited; they were working on selling a house before buying one they liked and said they were already working with a lender
  • 03:48 – She took them out to see homes, the last home was the original one they were looking at; the sellers and their agent were there
  • 04:40 –The agent’s male client starts losing his mind; he was shouting obscenities, trying to move past his agent to where her clients were standing, his wife started crying
  • 05:30 – She leaves the house with her clients, apologizes, and walks back in to talk to their agent; something was going on
  • 06:02 – She learned that the sellers and her clients had had an altercation and fight that involved police not long before the showing
  • 07:00 – The clients and the realtor who referred them to her were friends and had set her up to show it, knowing that guy from the altercation was the seller
  • 07:30 – The seller had just gotten his stitches taken out from the last altercation
  • 07:40 – Laura learned that it is important to prequalify clients before taking them out to make sure they are serious about the purchase
  • 08:18 – If that had happened now, 10 years later, Laura would’ve been better equipped to handle the escalation with the broker who referred the clients to her
  • 08:35 – Real estate is a self-policing profession; oftentimes new realtors aren’t prepared for this
  • 09:10 – Laura doesn’t know if that realtor is still in the business
  • 09:28 – What Laura would say to a potential buyer/seller who doesn’t want to answer questions
  • 09:43 – “I’d be more than happy to refer you somebody who might be more interested in dealing with this? Can recommend another agent?”
  • 10:00 – She has lost clients over this, but she refuses to invest valuable time in people who aren’t serious about doing something and don’t understand the importance of it
  • 10:30 – She insists on a lender letter (proof of funds letter if paying cash)
  • 11:00 – How to reach Laura: her website, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram

3 Key Points

  1. As a new realtor, be aware that you may need to self-police; if caught in a scary or serious situation, make your safety top priority.
  2. Make sure someone is prequalified before taking them out; not just to make sure that they’re at the right price point, but to make sure they’re legit and serious.
  3. Select clients that understand and respect your service and time investment; if they don’t, it is okay to acknowledge that it isn’t a good fit.
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